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EU & UK Factsheet
28 Nov, 2018

Facts for every occasion

Bob Wilkin of the European Movement has put together this collection of facts, ordered into:

  • EU members (accession date, population, GDP)
  • EU budget
  • Eurocracy (EU Institutions)
  • UK population
  • UK immigration and emigration
  • UK economy
  • UK workforce
  • UK government expenditure
  • EU free trade agreements
  • EU agencies

 

For easy printing, we have also uploaded it as a pdf document - access that here.

 

European Movement Key Fact Sheet

EUROPEAN UNION MEMBERS

Member State

Year Joined

Population (m)(1)

GDP (billions of GBP)(2)

GDP per capita (GBP)(2)

Austria

1995

8.793

324

36,849

Belgium

1958

11.366

383

33,702

Bulgaria

2007

7.102

45

6,346

Croatia

2013

4.154

43

10,288

Cyprus

2004

0.855

17

19,993

Czech Republic

2004

10.468

168

16,033

Denmark

1973

5.744

253

44,099

Estonia

2004

1.316

21

15,942

Finland

1995

5.577

196

35,109

France

1958

67.025

2,007

29,944

Germany

1958

82.438

2,869

34,808

Greece

1981

10.757

158

14,663

Hungary

2004

9.798

109

11,102

Ireland

1973

4.775

257

53,861

Italy

1958

61.219

1,510

24,674

Latvia

2004

1.950

23

11,954

Lithuania

2004

2.848

37

13,096

Luxembourg

1958

0.589

48

81,790

Malta

2004

0.440

10

22,957

Netherlands

1958

17.221

646

37,494

Poland

2004

37.973

409

10,763

Portugal

1986

10.310

170

16,505

Romania

2007

19.638

165

8,388

Slovakia

2004

5.435

75

13,724

Slovenia

2004

2.066

37

18,052

Spain

1986

46.529

1,021

21,943

Sweden

1995

10.080

416

41,317

United Kingdom

1973

65.809

2,044

31,064

 

EU GDP

Aggregate GDP for the EU28 is £13,462 billion and for the EU27 is £11,418 billion.

Average GDP per capita for the EU28 is £26,280 and for the EU27 is £25,574.

Notes

  1. Taken from EU Council Decision 2017/2461 of 12 December 2017. Total EU population on this basis is 512,272,941 (512 million) while the EU27 population is 446,464,368 (446 million).
  2. The GDP figures are for 2017 and are sourced from the International Monetary Fund (www.imf.org).The IMF states the GDP figures in local currencies and these have been converted to GBP using the IMF’s average exchange rates for 2017 for the relevant currencies.

 

 

EU BUDGET

Note that the figures in this section have been extracted and derived from data on the Europa website including in particular a spreadsheet referenced as internet-tables-all.xls.  EUR to GBP exchange rate conversion is at the average rate for 2017 used by the IMF in their data being €1 = 87.6p.

The EU’s Europa website has a lot of detailed information about the EU’s budgeting and its sources of income and expenditure.  A good point to start is at https://europa.eu/european-union/about-eu/money/expenditure_en.

The budget for 2017 was EUR 157.9 billion (£138.3 billion) to cover expenditure and commitments.  The EU’s budget is not allowed to exceed 1.2% of the aggregated Gross National Income (“GNI”) of the member states.  Budgets are currently running at about 1% of GNI.  It should be noted that the actual planned expenditure and income for 2017 were lower at EUR 137.4 billion (£120.4 billion) and EUR 139.0 billion (£121.8 billion) respectively.

A pie chart showing the budget allocation is available in the pdf version

The largest share goes on creating growth and jobs and reducing economic gaps between the EU's various regions (in 1a and 1b in the pie chart).  Agriculture, rural development, fisheries and environmental protection (in 2 in the table above) also account for a major share but the agricultural budget has fallen significantly over the years from 70% of the budget in 1985 to about 40% today.  Other areas of expenditure include combating terrorism, organised crime and illegal immigration.  Notably, only 6% of the EU’s budget is spent on administration.

The EU gets its funds from three sources:

  • customs duties on imports from outside the EU and sugar levies (referred to in EU parlance as Traditional Own Resources or TORs);
  • a small part of theV AT levied in the EU,
  • GNI: each Member State transfers a standard percentage of its GNI to the EU. This forms about three quarters of the income for the EU budget.

UK Contribution

The UK is a net contributor to the EU budget.  In 2017 its budgeted contribution was as follows:

UK Contribution

Contribution

EU Expenditure in UK

Net Contribution

Net Contribution as % of GDP

In EUR millions

13,757

6,326

7,431

                            0.32%

In GBP millions

12,051

5,542

6,509

 

Notes

  1. EUR 3,621 million (£3,172 million) of the EU expenditure in the UK was relating to agriculture and rural development. That is 57% of the total compared with agricultural support averaging 40% across the EU as a whole.  And for those who go on about French farmers, the French percentage is 67%.
  2. The net contribution equates to £125 million per week or £99 per person per year in the UK.
  3. There are variations in the figures used by various parties. See notes in the UK Government Expenditure section below.

Other Net Contributors

Country

Contribution (EUR millions)

EU Expenditure (EUR millions)

Net Contribution (EUR millions)

Net Contribution (GBP millions)

Net Contribution as % of GDP

Austria

2,650

1,743

907

794

              0.25%

Denmark

2,269

1,459

810

710

              0.28%

Finland

1,735

1,501

234

205

              0.10%

France

17,903

13,505

4,398

3,852

              0.19%

Germany

23,683

10,927

12,756

11,174

              0.39%

Ireland

2,062

1,818

244

214

              0.08%

Italy

13,840

9,795

4,045

3,543

              0.23%

Netherlands

5,849

2,417

3,432

3,006

              0.47%

Sweden

3,155

1,504

1,651

1,446

              0.35%

 

Net Beneficiaries

Country

Contribution (EUR millions)

EU Expenditure (EUR millions)

Net Benefit (EUR millions)

Net Benefit (GBP millions)

Net Benefit as % of GDP

Belgium

5,093

7,358

2,265

1,984

              0.52%

Bulgaria

455

1,896

1,441

1,262

              2.80%

Croatia

405

663

258

226

              0.53%

Cyprus

159

207

48

42

              0.25%

Czech Republic

1,549

3,895

2,346

2,055

              1.22%

Estonia

184

648

464

406

              1.93%

Greece

1,408

5,130

3,722

3,260

              2.06%

Hungary

969

4,049

3,080

2,698

              2.48%

Latvia

219

737

518

454

              1.97%

Lithuania

354

1,575

1,221

1,070

              2.89%

Luxembourg

329

1,827

1,498

1,312

              2.73%

Malta

94

201

107

94

              0.94%

Poland

3,716

11,921

8,205

7,188

              1.76%

Portugal

1,532

3,976

2,444

2,141

              1.26%

Romania

1,391

4,742

3,351

2,935

              1.78%

Slovakia

693

1,645

952

834

              1.11%

Slovenia

360

476

116

102

              0.28%

Spain

9,616

9,664

48

42

              0.01%

 

Notes

  1. Belgium and Luxembourg would appear to be anomalous as net beneficiaries; probably due to their being host nations to major EU institutions.
  2. The total contributions in the table above are EUR 115.4 billion which is significantly less than the budgeted income of EUR 139.0 billion. The EUR 23.6 billion difference is comprised of prior year surpluses and other revenues (e.g. competition law fines).

 

 

EUROCRACY

The EU institutions and their staffing levels are as follows:

Institution

Role

Staff No.

European Commission

The Commission is independent of national governments, and represents the interests of the EU as a whole. It has 4 essential functions:

·       proposing EU policies and legislation;

·       ensuring the terms of EU treaties and laws are respected (“guardian of the treaties”);

·       managing andimplementing EU policies and the budget for them; and

·       representing the EU around the world in matters falling under the Commission's responsibility.

A new set of Commissioners is appointed every 5 years, following the European elections.  The Commission President is elected by the Parliament, based on a proposal from the European Council.  Commissioners – currently 1 from each country, including the President and Vice Presidents – are vetted by Parliament before taking office.

        32,000

European Parliament

The European Parliament represents EU citizens directly.  The Parliament is elected for 5 year terms and has 751 MEPs (including 73 from the UK)

Parliament’s principal function is to adopt, jointly with the Council, draft legislation put forward by the Commission. Another function is control and approval of the EU budget. Parliament also exercises democratic supervision of the Commission, which includes the power to dismiss the Commissioners en bloc, through a vote of censure (see Note 1 below).

          7,500

Council of the European Union

The Council is the voice of national governments. Heads of state usually meet 4 times a year while relevant national ministers meet more frequently to discuss and decide specific policy on external (foreign) relations, economic & financial affairs, transport, energy, agriculture, etc.

Most decisions are by qualified majority vote (see Note 2 below), although numerous issues in areas like taxation, asylum or immigration, as well as foreign & security policy require unanimity

          3,500

Court of Justice of the European Union

CJEU makes sure EU legislation is interpreted and applied in the same way in all member countries.

CJEU can also rule in legal disputes involving EU countries, EU institutions, businesses or individuals. It is located in Luxembourg and made up of judges from all EU countries.

          2,200

Court of Auditors

The Court of Auditors checks the EU budget (funded by a combination of tax and customs duties) is spent correctly

              900

European Central Bank

The ECB runs monetary policy for the eurozone.

          3,400

European External Action Service

The EU's foreign and security policy service.

          4,100

European Economic and Social Committee

A consultative body in Brussels that represents employers, trade unions and civil society.

              700

European Committee of the Regions

A consultative body in Brussels that represents local and regional government.

              600

European Investment Bank

The EIB funds projects in the EU's poorer regions and helps small and medium-sized businesses.

          3,000

European Ombudsman

The Ombudsman investigates complaints about maladministration in EU institutions from citizens, businesses and other bodies.

              100

European Data Protection Supervisor

The EDPS ensures that when any EU institution or body processes citizens' personal data, it respects their right to privacy.

              100

 

The total staff number listed above is 58,100.  The numbers have been drawn from the websites and annual reports of the organisations.  The numbers are rounded.  Some organisations merely give a rounded number in the first place while others are more precise (e.g. the European Ombudsman states she has 81 staff in her 2017 annual report).

In addition, there are the 44 EU agencies which provide services across the Member States.  They have about 9,500 staff in aggregate.  A listing of the agencies is set out in the Appendix to this document.

Notes

  1. Although the censure power has never been used, the threat of its use was pivotal in the mass resignation of the Santer commission in 1999 following a corruption scandal.
  2. Qualified majority means at least 16 of the 28 member states, which must also represent at least 65% of the EU's total population.

 

 

UK POPULATION

The UK total population is about 65.8 million (see European Union Members section above and Note 1 thereto).  Of these:

  • 55.4 million (84.2%) live in England;
  • 5.5 million (8.2%) live in Scotland;
  • 3.1 million (4.7%) live in Wales; and
  • 1.9 million (2.8%) live in Northern Ireland

The average annual birth rate is about 720,000 and the death rate 585,000.  So, between the EU referendum in June 2016 and the planned leaving of the EU in March 2019, there will have been about 2 million births and 1.6 million deaths.  There will also have been about 2 million people reaching voting age who will not have had an opportunity to vote on whether the UK should remain in the EU.

Life expectancy at birth is now 80.8 years (78.6 years for males and 83.1 years for females).

In terms of ethnicity, the UK population is:

  • 87.2% white;
  • 3.0% black / African / Caribbean / black British;
  • 4.1% Asian / Asian British Indian and Pakistani origin; and
  • 5.7% other.

Birthplaces of the UK population are (see Notes 1 and 4 below):

  • 85.5% born in the UK
  • 4.4% born in the EU27 (see Note 2 below)
  • 2.6% born in South Asia (see Note 3 below)
  • 2.1% born in Africa
  • 1.0% born in East and South East Asia
  • 0.9% born in the Middle East
  • 0.5% born in the Caribbean
  • 0.5% born in North America
  • 0.4% born in non-EU Europe
  • 0.3% born in Australia and New Zealand
  • 0.2% born in Latin America
  • 1.6% born elsewhere

Notes

  1. Source of the above birthplace data is the United Nations Population Division for 2015.
  2. 2.89 million of which 52,000 from Bulgaria, 85,000 from Cyprus, 150,000 from France, 322,000 from Germany, 56,000 from Hungary, 503,000 from Ireland, 151,000 from Italy, 66,000 from Latvia, 117,000 from Lithuania, 68,000 from Netherlands, 703,000 from Poland, 99,000 from Portugal, 89,000 from Romania, 68,000 from Slovakia and 91,000 from Spain.All other EU countries less than 50,000 each.
  3. 1.74 million of which 230,000 from Bangladesh, 777,000 from India, 55,000 from Nepal, 540,000 from Pakistan and 139,000 from Sri Lanka.
  4. Other countries over 100,000 are: Australia (136,000), China (183,000), Ghana (103,000), Hong Kong (120,000), Israel (249,000), Jamaica (173,000), Kenya (151,000), Nigeria (216,000), Philippines (140,000), Somalia (111,000), South Africa (219,000), Turkey (101,000), USA (212,000) and Zimbabwe (133,000).

 

 

UK IMMIGRATION AND EMIGRATION

For the year to March 2018:

  • The UK had net migration of 270,000 with 614,000 immigrants and 344,000 emigrants. This is lower than the peak years of 2015 and 2016.
  • Net migration by EU citizens was 88,000 with 226,000 arrivals and 138,000 departures.This is a decrease of 19,000 in the number of EU arrivals since the previous year ending March 2017.  It is also well down from the net EU migration peak of 189,000 in the year to June 2016.
  • Net migration from the rest of the world citizens was 235,000 with 316,000 arrivals and 81,000 departures. This is an increase of 50,000 in the number of rest of the world arrivals since the previous year ending March 2017.
  • Meanwhile, 72,000 UK citizens returned to the UK and 124,000 departed

Most arrivals (253,000) came for work with about 70% (176,000) having a definite job on arrival. Another 191,000 came for the purposes of study.

Asylum

Another tricky subject but in simple terms in the year to June 2018, the UK issued 14,308 grants of asylum and similar forms of protection and resettlement.  This was down 12% from 16,215 grants in the previous year.

In addition, 6,051 family reunion visas were granted to the partners and children of those who have been granted asylum or protection.

Note.  Source of the above migration data is ONS Migration Statistics Quarterly Report for August 2018.

 

 

THE UK ECONOMY

The UK’s GDP in 2017 was just over £2 trillion (£2,044 billion) - (see European Union Members section above and Note 2 thereto).  The UK has the fifth largest economy in the world after the US, China, Japan and Germany.

About 80% of the UK’s GDP is derived from services.  19% comes from industry and less than 1% from agriculture and fisheries.

The labour force in the UK is about 32.4 million (as at June 2018) and this is spread across services, industry and agriculture in about the same proportions to the GDP.

UK Exports

The UK’s 2017 exports are about £616 billion (which equates to c. 30% of GDP).

EXPORTS (£ millions)

Goods

Services

Total

EU27

                   164,085

                   109,893

                  273,978

ROW

                   174,786

                   167,146

                  341,932

TOTAL

                   338,871

                   277,039

                  615,910

 

  • 44% to the EU (of which 9% are to Germany, 7% France and 6% to each of Netherlands and Ireland);
  • 18% to the USA;
  • 4% to China; and
  • 3% to Switzerland.

All other countries are less than 3%.

UK Imports

The UK’s 2017 imports are about £642 billion (which equates to c. 31% of GDP).

IMPORTS (£ millions)

Goods

Services

Total

EU27

                   259,141

                     81,861

                  341,002

ROW

                   217,178

                     83,616

                  300,794

TOTAL

                   476,319

                   165,477

                  641,796

 

  • 53% from the EU (of which 12% are from Germany, 7% from Netherlands, 6% from France, 5% from Spain, 4% from each of Belgium and Italy, and 3% from Ireland).
  • 11% from the USA;
  • 7% from China; and
  • 3% from Norway.

All other countries are less than 3%.

Note.  The data in the tables above comes from ONS’s The Pink Book 2018

The EU Perspective

When considering international trade from an EU perspective, it is necessary to distinguish between Intra EU28 trading (which is international trading between Member States) and Extra EU28 trading (which is trade between a Member State and a non-Member State).

The UK Exports table above shows that 48% of the UK’s goods exports go to the EU27.  However, those exports represent only 5.6% of the exports measured in terms of the Intra EU28 trade in goods in 2017.

Similarly, the UK Imports table above shows that 54% of the UK’s goods imports come from the EU27. Those imports represent only 9% of the imports measured in terms of the Intra EU28 trade in goods in 2017.

It is these differentials (48% to 5.6% and 54% to 9%) which clearly demonstrate the risk to a percentage reduction in trade with the EU27 post-Brexit having a far greater potential for causing damage to the UK economy than to the economies of the EU27.  Even though the EU27 may sell more to the UK in terms of value, it is these percentages which give the lie to the “they need us more than we need them” trope.

Note.  The EU data in this section is taken from Eurostat’s “International Trade in Goods: Statistics Explained” dated 18 October 2018

 

 

UK WORKFORCE

The data in this section is drawn from ONS’s “UK Labour Market: November 2018” statistical bulletin.

In the period July to September 2018:

  • There were 32.41 million people in work;
  • There were 1.38 million unemployed people (i.e. people not in work but seeking and available for work) giving an unemployment rate of 4.1%;
  • Average Weekly Earnings (£493 per week) had increased by 3.2% over the previous year’s figure (£478 per week) not taking account of inflation but the real increase was 0.9% once inflation had been taken into account. The AWE is still about £10 per week less than the peak achieved in March 2008.  The foregoing figures do not include bonuses etc. which average an additional £31 per week.

Non-UK Workers

In this section:

  • EU14 means Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Portugal, Spain and Sweden; and
  • EU8 means Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Slovak Republic and Slovenia;

In the period July to September 2018:

  • There were 3.49 million non-UK nationals working in the UK. This was down from 3.59 million a year earlier;
  • 2.25 million workers were from the EU27 down from 2.38 million a year earlier. These are broken down as follows:

 

July – Sept 2018

July – Sept 2017

EU14

                 990,000

                 986,000

EU8

                 881,000

             1,035,000

Bulgaria and Romania

                 363,000

                 347,000

Cyprus, Malta and Croatia

                   11,000

                      8,000

Total EU27

             2,245,000

             2,376,000

 

  • 1.24 million workers were non-EU nationals (up from 1.21 million a year earlier).

 

 

 

UK GOVERNMENT EXPENDITURE

Note.  The data in this section comes from HM Treasury’s Public Expenditure Statistical Analyses 2018 (Cm 9648 dated July 2018) (“PESA”).

Total UK Government expenditure for the year 2017-18, including both central and local government, is £789 billion.

PESA states (at Table C.1) that the UK’s gross contribution to the EU budget is £12,903 million with £4,126 million receipts from the EU giving a net contribution to the EU budget of £8,777 million (see note re Traditional Own Resources below).  From the above, the following can be derived based on a UK GDP of £2,044 billion (see section European Union Members above)

 

£ millions

% of Contribution

% of Government Expenditure

% of GDP

Contribution to EU

            12,903

 

              1.64%

              0.63%

Receipts from EU

              4,126

                      32%

              0.52%

              0.20%

Net EU Contribution

              8,777

                      68%

              1.12%

              0.43%

 

Notes

Data Sources

There are various data sources and each has its own set of parameters which leads to differing end figures.  Sometimes the differences are minor and do not need to be worried about; others are more significant and need reconciliation (a good example being the treatment of Traditional Own Resources).  The figures in this section are based on PESA but, for instance, HM Treasury calculations in Cm 9576 dated March 2018 (“European Union Finances 2017”) says that UK’s gross contribution to the EU budget after the UK rebate for 2017 is £12,992 million and its net contribution is £8,909 million.

Traditional Own Resources

Traditional Own Resources (“TOR”) is EU terminology relating to the EU’s entitlement to receive the income from customs duties (including those on agricultural products) and sugar levies which are collected on its behalf by each Member State.  Each Member State may retain a proportion of the TOR income to cover the cost of collection.  For the UK, the total TOR revenue for 2017-18 was £4,136 million of which £3,413 million went to the EU.  The figures in the table above include the £3,413 million TOR income to the EU.

The UK Abatement

The UK abatement dating back to the Thatcher government is excluded from all the figures in this paper. For reference, according to PESA, the value of the abatement in 2017-18 was £4,411 million.

The Infamous £350 million per week on the side of the bus

£350 million per week equates to £18.2 billion per year.  The only way you can get to that sum is if you add in the UK abatement which is a sum the UK does not pay to the EU.

 

 

EU FREE TRADE AND OTHER AGREEMENTS

The EU Commission maintains a team of about 600 people to deal with international trade agreements and the like which keeps their Free Trade Agreements ticking over and adds new ones from time to time (Japan is the most recent).

Shortly after the June 2016 referendum, the Financial Times undertook an analysis which identified 759 bilateral agreements between the EU and third countries which were broken down as follows:

  • 295 bilateral trade deals
  • 202 regulatory co-operation arrangements
  • 69 re fisheries
  • 65 re transport
  • 49 re customs arrangements
  • 45 re nuclear issues, and
  • 34 re agriculture

So to get the UK on an even keel post Brexit, the UK would need to replicate many of those arrangements from a current zero starting position.

 

 

Appendix to European Movement Key Fact Sheet

EU AGENCIES

There are 44 EU agencies which provide services throughout the EU.  Details of these agencies can be found in the EU document “EU_Agencies_brochure_2016.pdf” which can be googled.  A brief listing of these agencies is, however, as follows:

Agency

Role

Location

Agency for the Cooperation of Energy Regulators (“ACER”)

Internal energy market

Ljubljana, Slovenia

Office of the Body of European Regulators for Electronic Communications (“BEREC OFFICE”)

The BEREC Office supports BEREC which is committed to independent, consistent, high-quality regulation of electronic communications markets for the benefit of Europe and its citizens.

Riga, Latvia

Bio-Based Industries Joint Undertaking (“BBIJU”)

Development of a sustainable bio-based industry sector in Europe

Brussels, Belgium

Translation Centre for the Bodies of the European Union  (“CdT”)

The EU translation agency.

Luxembourg

European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training (“CEDEFOP”)

The EU agency promoting learning for work.

Thessaloniki, Greece

European Union Agency for Law Enforcement Training (“CEPOL”)

European and international law enforcement cooperation through training.

Budapest, Hungary

Clean Sky 2 Joint Undertaking (CLEANSKY JU”)

Research in aeronautics

Brussels, Belgium

Community Plant Variety Office (“CPVO”)

Foster innovation and research by protecting plant varieties in the EU.

Angers, France

European Aviation Safety Agency (“EASA”)

Aviation safety in Europe and worldwide.

Cologne, Germany

European Asylum Support Office (“EASO”)

The EU asylum agency.

Valletta, Malta

European Banking Authority (“EBA”)

EU banking supervision.

London, UK but moving to Paris, France

European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (“ECDC”)

EU agency aimed at strengthening Europe’s defences against infectious diseases

Stockholm, Sweden

European Chemicals Agency (ECHA”)

Chemical safety

Helsinki, Finland

European Defence Agency (“EDA”)

Fostering defence co-operation among member states.

Brussels, Belgium

European Environment Agency (“EEA”)

The EU’s environment agency.

Copenhagen, Denmark

European Fisheries Control Agency (“EFCA”)

Fisheries control.

Vigo, Spain

European Food Safety Authority (“EFSA”)

General food law.  EFSA’s scientific advice helps to protect consumers, animals and the environment from food-related risks.

Parma, Italy

European Institute for Gender Equality (EIGE”)

EU knowledge centre on gender equality.

Vilnius, Lithuania

European Insurance and Occupational Pensions Authority (“EIOPA”)

Insurance and pensions.

Frankfurt, Germany

European Institute of Innovation and Technology (“EIT”)

Innovation and entrepreneurship.

Budapest, Hungary

European Medicines Agency (“EMA”)

Foster scientific excellence in the evaluation and supervision of medicines, for the benefit of public and animal health in the European Union.

London, UK but moving to Amsterdam, Netherlands.

European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (“EMCDDA”)

Monitoring the EU drugs problem.

Lisbon, Portugal

European Maritime Safety Agency (“EMSA”)

Safer seas, cleaner oceans and quality shipping.

Lisbon, Portugal

European Union Agency for Network and Information Security (“ENISA”)

The EU cyber security agency.

Heraklion, Greece

European Securities and Markets Authority (“ESMA”)

The independent regulatory authority for the European Union’s securities and capital markets

Paris, France

European Training Foundation (“ETF”)

External assistance in human capital development.

Turin, Italy

European Union Institute for Security Studies (“EUISS”)

EUISS is the Union’s agency dealing with the analysis of foreign, security and defence policy issues

Paris, France

European Agency for the Operational Management of Large- Scale IT Systems in the Area of Freedom, Security and Justice (“eu-LISA”)

Providing ICT support in the fields of asylum, law enforcement and border management.

Tallinn, Estonia and Strasbourg, France

EU Agency for Safety and Health at Work (“EU-OSHA”)

Safety and health at work.

Bilbao, Spain

European Union Intellectual Property Office (“EUIPO”)

The EU intellectual property agency.

Alicante, Spain

European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions (“EUROFOUND”)

EUROFOUND carries out in-depth original research to provide knowledge in the area of social, employment and work-related policies in order to contribute to the planning and design of better living and working conditions in Europe

Dublin, Ireland

European Union’s Judicial Co-Operation Unit (“EUROJUST”)

EUROJUST strengthens judicial coordination and cooperation between national authorities in the fight against serious cross-border organised crime.

The Hague, Netherlands

European Union Agency for Railways (“ERA”)

Railways.

Valenciennes, France

European Police Office (“EUROPOL”)

Europol provides a unique range of services for its law enforcement partners, to tackle international organised crime and terrorism.

The Hague, Netherlands

Fusion for Energy - The European Joint Undertaking for ITER and the Development of Fusion Energy (“F4E”)

Fusion energy development.

Barcelona, Spain

Fuel Cells and Hydrogen 2 Joint Undertaking (“FCH 2 JU”)

FCH 2 JU is a funding agency supporting research and innovation activities in the field of fuel cells and hydrogen.

Brussels, Belgium

European Agency for Fundamental Rights (“FRA”)

FRA provides independent, evidence-based advice on fundamental rights to EU and national decision makers to make debates, policies and legislation on fundamental rights better informed and targeted.

Vienna, Austria

European Border and Coast Guard Agency (“FRONTEX”)

To support member states in the management of EU’s external borders.

Warsaw, Poland

European GNSS Agency (“GSA”)

Linking space to user needs.

Prague, Czech Republic

Innovative Medicines Initiative (“IMI”)

Health research and drug development.

Brussels, Belgium

European Union Satellite Centre (“SatCen”)

Exploiting space assets and collateral data in support of the EU’s foreign and security policy.

Torrejon, Spain

Single European Sky ATM Research (SESAR) Joint Undertaking (“SESAR JU”)

SESAR JU is a public-private partnership responsible for developing technological and operational solutions to better manage air traffic while on the ground and in the sky.

Brussels, Belgium

Shift2Rail Joint Undertaking (“SJR JU”)

Railway research and innovation.

Brussels, Belgium

Single Resolution Board (“SRB”)

The SRB is the EU resolution authority within the banking union.

Brussels, Belgium

 

 

 

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